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Figure Captions and Credits

Figure designations listed below refer to the chapter or appendix label,
together with the serial order within each chapter or appendix.
For example, figure 3.2 is the second figure in chapter 3.

Links to cited materials are highlighted in bold blue text.
Please note that the use of the cited public domain images and other material does not indicate
endorsement of this site by any of the source organizations or individuals.

 
Logo – The planet Jopitar
The image is a modified photo of Jupiter (rotated 180 degrees from the standard orientation, then flipped east-west), credit NASA / Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) / University of Arizona.

Figure 1.1 – A tribe of reys in V-formation, gliding down from the cloud tops of Jopitar
The image is a modified public-domain photo "Clouds are Coming", by Vera Kratochvil,
distributed on PublicDomainPictures.net .

Figure 2.1 – The planet Jopitar, in crescent phase
The image is a modified photo of Jupiter (rotated 90 degrees from the standard orientation, then flipped east-west), credit NASA / JPL.
The background star field is a tiny portion of a high-resolution panoramic view of the Milky Way,
credit European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Serge Brunier.

Figure 2.2 – A rey, searching for manna amidst the deep hot springs

Figure 3.1 – The towering thunderhead in Na's dream
The image is a modified photo of a cumulonimbus incus cloud in Mykonos, Greece, by SFortis,
licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license,
and displayed on Wikimedia Commons.

Figure 3.2 – A tangle of tornadoes confronted by Na and Ki
The image is a modified photo of a tornado and associated clouds, credit National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Figure 3.3 – An overhead view of the mighty storm that swept up Na and Ki
The image is based on a 3D reconstruction of 1984 Hurricane Diana, credit NOAA.

Figure 4.1 – Lightning that attended Ki as she searched for other reys
The image is a cropped public-domain photo "Thunder Light", by Petre Kratochvil,
distributed on PublicDomainPictures.net .

Figure 5.1 – A mature octo
The image is based on a public-domain retouched drawing of Octopus Cyanea, dated to 1886,
attributed to a report on the cephalopoda collected by H. M. S. Challenger during the years 1873-76,
and displayed on Wikimedia Commons.

Figure 8.1 – The metons Na, Nemo and Ulixis, as they approach Aerth on their mission
The image of Aerth is from a photo of Earth in crescent phase (showing eastern Africa)
taken by Apollo-11 astronauts in July, 1969, credit NASA.

Figure 8.2 – The northward side of the simion farmhouse visited by Na
The image is a retouched photograph taken in 1955 by my mother, Mrs. Marjorie Bond,
shortly after my family moved into the house in Candia, New Hampshire.

Figure 9.1 – The starry sky that greeted Na and his companions in deep space, after leaving the suolar system
The image is a small portion of a high-resolution panoramic view of the Milky Way,
credit European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Serge Brunier.

Figure 12.1 – The configuration of black holes encountered by Na, Nemo and Ulixis after they entered the galactic core
The galactic core backdrop is a modified photo of the Omega Centauri globular star cluster, credit ESO / INAF-VST / OmegaCAM.
Foreground stars are from a Hubble Space Telescope photo of the core of the NGC-6397 globular star cluster, credit NASA.

Figure 13.1 – A glimpse of the voidling

Figure 14.1 – Omen's moon-1, as Na and Ulixis first encountered it
The image is a modified photo of Jupiter's moon Io, credit NASA / JPL / University of Arizona.
The background star field is a tiny portion of a high-resolution panoramic view of the Milky Way,
credit European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Serge Brunier.

Figure 15.1 – A nascent thicket, growing at 512 kilurets depth in Omen’s atmosphere
Because the scene would be pitch black in “visible” light, it is depicted as it might appear to a creature with trichromatic infrared vision.

Figure 16.1 – An early voidling comet strike on a mid-sized moon of Outpost
The targeted moon is a modified photo of Jupiter's moon Callisto, credit NASA / JPL.
The incoming body is from an artist concept of a collision between objects that created the dust ring around the star Vega,
credit NASA / JPL-Cal Tech.
The starry background is a modified infrared photo of the Bootes star field, credit NASA / JPL-Cal Tech / UC Irvine.

Figure 17.1 – A megon candidate moon surveyed by Na and Neris in their reality-2 simulation
The image is a modified photo of Saturn's moon Enceladus, credit NASA / JPL.

Figure 18.1 – The Gift being presented to Poy during a reality-two trance
The gift object is a composite of modified public-domain images of gemstones and viruses.
The hands are a modified photo of the hands of my wife, Susan M. Bond.
The starry background is a modified infrared photo of the Bootes star field, credit NASA / JPL-Cal Tech / UC Irvine.
The planet is a modified Cassini photo of Jupiter, credit NASA / JPL / Space Science Institute.

Figure 19.1 – A distant view of galaxy G-3, the destination of Na-3 and Nemo-3
The image is a modified photo of spiral galaxy NGC6744 (many foreground stars and some background galaxies have been removed),
credit European Southern Observatory (ESO).

Figure 20.1 – Metons streaming from their megon starship, in the outer halo of galaxy G-3
The image backdrop is a modified photo of spiral galaxy NGC4603, credit NASA/STSci.
The distant star system is a modified photo of dwarf galaxy NGC5477, credit ESA / Hubble & NASA.
The planet is a modified artist concept of super-Earth-size planet Kepler-62f, credit NASA Ames / JPL-Caltech / Tim Pyle.

Figure A.1 – The planet Jopitar, in gibbous phase
The image is a modified photo of Jupiter (rotated 180 degrees from the standard orientation, then flipped east-west), credit NASA / JPL / University of Arizona.
The background star field is a tiny portion of a high-resolution panoramic view of the Milky Way,
credit European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Serge Brunier.

Figure A.2 – A cross section of Jopitar’s atmosphere and interior
For relevant references, see the Commentary and References page of this website dealing with the planet Jopitar.